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See what Live and Push are capable of — check out these tips and tricks from artists and expert educators. Watch more music-making tips and tricks. Find help articles on all of our products plus support for your shopping and product licence questions.

Check out the Live Knowledge Base. All over the globe, a growing group of trainers and institutions are offering approved Ableton teaching at all skill levels, both for individuals and groups. Learn the fundamentals of music making — beats, melodies, harmonies, basslines, and song structure — and make music right in your browser. Get started making music. Check out chapters from the book. More video tutorials See what Live and Push are capable of — check out these tips and tricks from artists and expert educators.

Check out the manual Knowledge Base Find help articles on all of our products plus support for your shopping and product licence questions. Check out the Live Knowledge Base Certified Training All over the globe, a growing group of trainers and institutions are offering approved Ableton teaching at all skill levels, both for individuals and groups.

Find training near you. Using Live 10? Check out the Learn Live 10 series Learning Music Learn the fundamentals of music making — beats, melodies, harmonies, basslines, and song structure — and make music right in your browser.

 
 

Ableton live 9 suite tutorials free.Getting Started with Live 9 – new tutorial series

 

Play video: MPE. Play video: Hybrid Reverb. Hybrid Reverb. Setup See all See all Setup videos. Play video: Setting up an audio interface. Setting up an audio interface. Setting up MIDI. Play video: Using third-party plug-ins. Using third-party plug-ins. Interface See all See all Interface videos.

Play video: Session View. Session View. Play video: Arrangement View. Arrangement View. Play video: Wavetable: Overview. Wavetable: Overview. Play video: Drum Buss. Drum Buss. Play video: Delay. Workflows See all See all Workflows videos. Capturing MIDI. Play video: Warping clips. Underneath this are the Clip Slots. Underneath the clip slot is a mini control panel for each track.

Here you can enable or disable the track, adjust settings such as pan or gain, and route audio from or to nearly any other place. The default values are sufficient for now. Go ahead and delete the two MIDI tracks and one audio track so you are left with one track.

You can delete tracks by right-clicking on the track title bar and selecting Delete , or by left-clicking the title bar and using your delete or backspace key. If you only have one track, you won’t be able to delete it. Open the Browser from the left hand side — it’s time to find some sounds! Underneath Categories , select Samples. Use the right side of the browser to search for some sounds you like — Ableton comes with lots of samples, and each version Intro, Standard, and Suite comes with a different selection.

You can use the cursor or the arrow keys to select a sample, and doing so will play a preview of it. Most of these will be short sounds of people or instruments. If you want something a bit more complex, select Clips from the Categories submenu.

Clips are usually longer samples, but most of them won’t preview when you click them. To hear a preview, select Click to Preview from the bottom of the browser. Once you’ve found a sample you like, drag it into an empty clip slot by clicking and holding with the left mouse button. This will now show up as a clip. You can drag multiple clips onto empty clip slots, or drag them over existing clips to replace the old clips with the new ones.

Once in the session view, clips have a random color assigned. You can change this by right-clicking and selecting a new color. Press the small triangle next to a clip to play it. Notice how the interface changes. The triangle turns green, and you get audio meters on this track and the master. Down in the mixer section, try playing around with the various controls. The Track Activator will enable or disable the track. When disabled, no sound will come out of the track, but it will keep playing — think of this like a mute button.

Use the Pan Knob to adjust the pan of the track, or adjust the volume using the Track Volume Slider to the right of the output levels. Go ahead and drag some more clips onto the track. Once you have more than one clip, try playing another one — what do you notice? There are several things that happen once you trigger a new clip in the same track. The currently playing clip stops, and the new clip starts. The new clip won’t start immediately however — it will start after a period of time usually one bar.

This is where a knowledge of basic music theory will be useful to you. If you start a clip in the middle of a bar, Ableton will wait until the start of the bar before playing that clip. This makes music sound better and keeps it in time. You can change this from the Quantization menu on the top-left settings bar. This menu also lets you change the time signature and tempo. If you would like to play more than one clip at the same time, you’ll need another track.

You can create a new track by right clicking in some empty space, and selecting Insert Audio Track or Insert Midi Track. Once you have more than one track, you can trigger all of the horizontal clips across multiple tracks using a Scene. A scene is a single row of clips whereas a track is a column.

Scenes can be found on the right hand side under the Master track, and can be colored, renamed and adjusted just like clips. Double clicking a clip will open it in the effects controls section at the bottom of the screen.

Here you can manipulate the audio sample, as well as fine-tune the sound. You can adjust where the sample starts or stops, as well as the pitch, timing, volume, and much more. Underneath the Sample Control, there is a Loop button, which is turned on by default. This means that once a clip is finished playing, it will start again. It won’t ever stop unless you press Stop.

If you’d like a particular clip to only play once, simply disable looping using the loop button. Looping can be configured on a per-clip basis, so you can have some clips looping, and others only playing once. The Warp button adjusts the timing of a clip to match the current timing of your project. This can sometimes get confused and muddled up, but there are things you can do to make it more accurate. Ableton has an in-depth guide to warping if you’d like to know more.

Finally, one of the most useful actions is the Launch Mode. This defines how clips play once started. If you don’t see the launch panel, you can show it by using the the small “L” button underneath the clip controls.

Gate : The clip will play for as long as it is held down. Once you release the mouse the clip will stop playing. Repeat : This repeats the clip every x bars — as defined in the quantization menu previously. Launch modes are where your creativity can really come alive. When used with a MIDI controller or keyboard shortcuts, you can get some really creative sounds out of Ableton.

Now that you know how to use session view, there’s one last trick you need to know. Press the Key button in the top-right.

This will turn on or off the Key Map Mode. This is where you can assign keyboard keys to almost any function in Ableton — the most important being triggering clips.

Once in key map mode, simply click an action such as starting a clip , and then press a key. Your new key will appear next to the function you pressed. Go ahead and exit key map mode when you’re finished. This lets you play a virtual musical keyboard with your computer keyboard. Disable it by pressing the little keyboard button on the top-right next to the key map mode button after ensuring you’re not in key map mode. Up until now, you’ve been working with samples — real, “genuine” audio recordings.

Now we’ll move on to MIDI. MIDI devices play a sound when given a command. Double-click an empty clip slot to create a new clip. You can play this clip, but no sound will come out — it’s an empty clip. This is a “virtual” keyboard that you can play or program. Clicking on the keys won’t produce any sound, however — you’ll need to press the MIDI Editor Preview button at the top of the virtual keyboard — it looks like a pair of headphones.

Even though you’ve enable the MIDI editor preview, you still won’t hear anything. You need to assign an instrument to the track before any sound will come out.

Press the B key to enter draw mode — this will allow you to enter notes. If you press the Fold button above the virtual keyboard, Ableton will hide all the keys you have not used yet.

Open the browser and select Instruments underneath the categories heading. Drag this instrument on top of your track name — this will assign it to the track. Now when you press play, you should have a pleasant piano sound! This instrument contains various effects and settings.

You don’t need to understand them all right now, but Ableton has made things simple for you by “summing” all the controls into a simple grand piano control panel — located in the effects controls section at the bottom of your screen. Try playing around with settings like Reverb and Bright and see what happens to your sound. This allows you to assign samples to keys on the keyboard, and is a neat self-contained way to trigger multiple samples. Inside the Browser’s Instruments section, drag the drum rack onto its own channel.

The effects panel will now show the drum rack controls. This mainly consists of 16 slots more are available on separate “pages”. Each slot is triggered by a note from the musical keyboard.

You can drag samples from the browser into a slot in the drum rack. You have various controls to alter the sample, and if you create a new clip on your drum rack channel, whatever note you play in this clip will trigger the sample you setup on the drum rack — pretty neat!

One particularly nice feature about Ableton is that it can work with a seemingly unending number of MIDI controllers or keyboards. I previously showed you how to build your own MIDI controller using an Arduino — which works pretty well.

 

Learn Live | Ableton.

 

All over the globe, a growing group of trainers and institutions are offering approved Ableton teaching at all skill levels, both for individuals and groups. Training in Helsinki: 1 trainers and institutions offer certified training in Helsinki. Not based in Helsinki? Find training near you. For beginners and seasoned users alike, Ableton User Groups are open to any Live user who wants to share their knowledge and learn from others in person.

Learn the fundamentals of music making — beats, melodies, harmonies, basslines, and song structure — and make music right in your browser.

Get started making music. Learn the fundamentals of synthesis at your own pace with a powerful but easy-to-learn synthesizer that runs in your web browser. Get started making sounds. Play video: Comping. New in Live Play video: MPE. Play video: Hybrid Reverb. Hybrid Reverb. Setup See all See all Setup videos. Play video: Setting up an audio interface. Setting up an audio interface. Setting up MIDI. Play video: Using third-party plug-ins.

Using third-party plug-ins. Interface See all See all Interface videos. Play video: Session View. Session View. Play video: Arrangement View. Arrangement View. Play video: Wavetable: Overview. Wavetable: Overview. Play video: Drum Buss. Drum Buss. Play video: Delay. Workflows See all See all Workflows videos. Capturing MIDI. Play video: Warping clips. Warping clips. Play video: Racks: Overview. Racks: Overview. Check out the manual. Still using Live 9? Check out the Learn Live 9 series.

Certified Training All over the globe, a growing group of trainers and institutions are offering approved Ableton teaching at all skill levels, both for individuals and groups. Training in Helsinki: 1 trainers and institutions offer certified training in Helsinki Not based in Helsinki? User Groups For beginners and seasoned users alike, Ableton User Groups are open to any Live user who wants to share their knowledge and learn from others in person.

Find a User Group near you. Learning Music Learn the fundamentals of music making — beats, melodies, harmonies, basslines, and song structure — and make music right in your browser. Learning Synths Learn the fundamentals of synthesis at your own pace with a powerful but easy-to-learn synthesizer that runs in your web browser.